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4 Ways to Keep Your Family Involved With Prepping

family of preppers

One of the most common problems that newer preppers run into doesn’t have anything to do with food storage, ammo or medical supplies. The problem many new preppers have is that even the most practical survivalists will still usually meet resistance from friends and family members when discussing preparedness for the first time.

 

Often times when newer preppers try to talk to their family about preparedness they’re met with half-hearted agreements at best and ignored or ridiculed at worst. While most of us understand the practical necessity to prep, it’s not always easy to explain that to other people in a way that will really get through to them in the way it got through to you.

 

Today we’ll be going over 4 tips that you can use to talk to your family about the importance of practical prepping and how you can convince them to turn preparedness into a family activity.

 

Don’t scare them

 

Even if you feel that the zombie apocalypse is only days away, that doesn’t mean that your family does (or should) share your fears. For some people, prepping has to provide a real, practical benefit that they can see now in order for them to take action.

 

Using fear simply doesn’t work and will even make them less likely to help you prep. Instead of focusing on zombies, pandemics and EMP’s you should focus these conversations on scenarios that are much more likely like tornadoes, winter storms and hurricanes.

 

Even if you truly do believe that one of the Hollywood disaster scenarios is coming soon, if you focus your preparations on natural disasters, it’s likely that you’ll be just as prepared if the worst does happen.

 

Compromise

 

Prepping as a family is all about compromises. There is no #1 authority on prepping out there. Not me, not you, and not the dozens of other popular preparedness gurus out there. None of us really knows what tomorrow will bring or what supplies, skills or mindset will be required to weather the next big disaster.

 

All of us are honestly just using educated guesses. Anyone that tells you different is wrong and likely trying to sell you something or simply trying to look tough on the internet.

 

This means that YOU in fact, are not an end-all authority on prepping either, and if you want your family to get on the bandwagon you’re going to need to be open to what they think is important too. If your spouse would rather invest money on food storage this month instead of another firearm or survival gear, it would be well advised for you to listen if you want to keep your prepping partner on board.

 

Sometimes roughing it isn’t the best way

 

There are a lot of preppers out there, especially young guys that pay very little attention to preparing for creature comforts in times of a disaster. They’ll gladly give up things like movies, comfortable clothing and the taste of their food because they don’t have a problem with roughing it a little (or a lot) during a disaster.

 

Although there may be a point where you need to abandon creature comforts in a disaster scenario, it’s not exactly a good selling point when convincing someone to start prepping. This means that instead of investing in that pallet of MRE’s that’s due to expire next year, you may need to look into some tastier and healthier food storage options. It also may mean that you will need to look into alternative energy sources for things like tablets, extra lighting and comfortable heat or cooling.

 

Make sure to keep the training fun

 

While having a nicely stocked cupboard and stockpile is great, nothing beats finely honed skills. As the old saying goes:

 

Give a man a fish and he can eat for a day, teach him to fish and he shall never go hungry again.

 

Training and skill building as a family can be a wonderful experience. Skills like gardening, hunting, fishing and cooking are all wonderful things to learn and practice as a family and can absolutely make you better prepared to face any kind of disaster scenario; however it’s important that these skills remain fun, especially for children.

 

Anyone that has children knows that kids only truly focus on what they want to. If an activity becomes a chore or a hassle then they are much less inclined to succeed in it. Make skill building and training a fun family activity and not only will you have a team that’s ready to face anything from hurricanes to roving hordes of  undead, but you’ll all have a lot of fun in the meantime too.

 

Preparedness doesn’t have to be a secretive or solitary activity. In fact, you’re much more likely to survive in a disaster scenario as a group than you are alone. As long as you keep your family in mind, keep the “doomsday” fears to a minimum and are willing to compromise, the “prepper talk” won’t be a cause for weird looks or rolled eyes, but could actually be the first step to becoming a strong, practical, self-reliant group of survivalists that’s ready for anything.

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